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GALLERIES

The Odisha State Tribal Museum, is set in the beautiful environment of the SCSTRTI, Bhubaneswar. The main Museum building houses five galleries that introduce the visitor to the tribal communities of Odisha through a series of thematic displays. Recreations of Tribal Shrines, an outdoor exhibition of Tribal Dwellings, the PTG World Gallery and an Herbal Garden, apart from a Tribal Food Court and Souvenir shop are other attractions at the Museum.

GALLERIES

The Odisha State Tribal Museum, is set in the beautiful environment of the SCSTRTI, Bhubaneswar. The main Museum building houses five galleries that introduce the visitor to the tribal communities of Odisha through a series of thematic displays. Recreations of Tribal Shrines, an outdoor exhibition of Tribal Dwellings, the PTG World Gallery and an Herbal Garden, apart from a Tribal Food Court and Souvenir shop are other attractions at the Museum.

GALLERIES

The Odisha State Tribal Museum, is set in the beautiful environment of the SCSTRTI, Bhubaneswar. The main Museum building houses five galleries that introduce the visitor to the tribal communities of Odisha through a series of thematic displays. Recreations of Tribal Shrines, an outdoor exhibition of Tribal Dwellings, the PTG World Gallery and an Herbal Garden, apart from a Tribal Food Court and Souvenir shop are other attractions at the Museum.

gallery 1

Gallery 1, Main Building

Personal Adornment

An introduction to the many tribal communities that live in Odisha, told through a display of their unique attire and ornaments. The gallery is a tribute to the human sense of aesthetics, as expressed through attire and body ornamentation. Here the visitor can acquaint themselves with the traditional attire of several of Odisha’s tribal communities and gaze upon the intricately crafted items of personal adornment such as bangles, hairpins, necklaces, waistbands and earrings.

gallery 2

Gallery 2, Main Building

Textiles, Personal Belongings, Art and Crafts

The gallery demonstrates the astounding skill and craftsmanship to be found among Odisha’s tribal communities through handcrafted combs, smoking pipes and purses alongside exquisite textiles, traditional paintings and beautiful examples of bamboo and paddy craft. Tribal communities such as the Juang, Koya, Kutia Kandha, Lanjia Saora, Santal, Bhottada and Dangria Kandha have crafted many of these beautiful objects. Hand woven textiles belonging to communities such as the Bonda, Munda, Santal, Dharua and Kandha are also part of the display.

gallery 1
gallery 2

Gallery 1, Main Building

Personal Adornment

An introduction to the many tribal communities that live in Odisha, told through a display of their unique attire and ornaments. The gallery is a tribute to the human sense of aesthetics, as expressed through attire and body ornamentation. Here the visitor can acquaint themselves with the traditional attire of several of Odisha’s tribal communities and gaze upon the intricately crafted items of personal adornment such as bangles, hairpins, necklaces, waistbands and earrings.

Gallery 2, Main Building

Textiles, Personal Belongings, Art and Crafts

The gallery demonstrates the astounding skill and craftsmanship to be found among Odisha’s tribal communities through handcrafted combs, smoking pipes and purses alongside exquisite textiles, traditional paintings and beautiful examples of bamboo and paddy craft. Tribal communities such as the Juang, Koya, Kutia Kandha, Lanjia Saora, Santal, Bhottada and Dangria Kandha have crafted many of these beautiful objects. Hand woven textiles belonging to communities such as the Bonda, Munda, Santal, Dharua and Kandha are also part of the display.

gallery 3

Gallery 3, Main Building

Hunting & Fishing Implements & Weapons of Offense and Defence

In this gallery, the skill at hunting is demonstrated along with the valour in defense of territory. Hunting and fishing implements, catapults, traps and snares are displayed alongside traditional weapons, bows, arrows, spears, axes, guns and swords. Apart from several intricate fishing traps designed to catch a variety of river fish, fishing spears, fish storage baskets and numerous fishing nets can be seen. Nets for trapping wild game as well as snares for rabbit, wild cock and other birds are also part of this display alongside traditional knives and axes that may be used for defence, clearing the forests and ceremonial sacrifices.

gallery 1
gallery 2
gallery 3

Gallery 1, Main Building

Personal Adornment

An introduction to the many tribal communities that live in Odisha, told through a display of their unique attire and ornaments. The gallery is a tribute to the human sense of aesthetics, as expressed through attire and body ornamentation. Here the visitor can acquaint themselves with the traditional attire of several of Odisha’s tribal communities and gaze upon the intricately crafted items of personal adornment such as bangles, hairpins, necklaces, waistbands and earrings.

Gallery 2, Main Building

Textiles, Personal Belongings, Art and Crafts

The gallery demonstrates the astounding skill and craftsmanship to be found among Odisha’s tribal communities through handcrafted combs, smoking pipes and purses alongside exquisite textiles, traditional paintings and beautiful examples of bamboo and paddy craft. Tribal communities such as the Juang, Koya, Kutia Kandha, Lanjia Saora, Santal, Bhottada and Dangria Kandha have crafted many of these beautiful objects. Hand woven textiles belonging to communities such as the Bonda, Munda, Santal, Dharua and Kandha are also part of the display.

Gallery 3, Main Building

Hunting & Fishing Implements & Weapons of Offense and Defence

In this gallery, the skill at hunting is demonstrated along with the valour in defense of territory. Hunting and fishing implements, catapults, traps and snares are displayed alongside traditional weapons, bows, arrows, spears, axes, guns and swords. Apart from several intricate fishing traps designed to catch a variety of river fish, fishing spears, fish storage baskets and numerous fishing nets can be seen. Nets for trapping wild game as well as snares for rabbit, wild cock and other birds are also part of this display alongside traditional knives and axes that may be used for defence, clearing the forests and ceremonial sacrifices.

gallery 1
gallery 2
gallery 3

Gallery 1, Main Building

Personal Adornment

An introduction to the many tribal communities that live in Odisha, told through a display of their unique attire and ornaments. The gallery is a tribute to the human sense of aesthetics, as expressed through attire and body ornamentation. Here the visitor can acquaint themselves with the traditional attire of several of Odisha’s tribal communities and gaze upon the intricately crafted items of personal adornment such as bangles, hairpins, necklaces, waistbands and earrings.

Gallery 2, Main Building

Textiles, Personal Belongings, Art and Crafts

The gallery demonstrates the astounding skill and craftsmanship to be found among Odisha’s tribal communities through handcrafted combs, smoking pipes and purses alongside exquisite textiles, traditional paintings and beautiful examples of bamboo and paddy craft. Tribal communities such as the Juang, Koya, Kutia Kandha, Lanjia Saora, Santal, Bhottada and Dangria Kandha have crafted many of these beautiful objects. Hand woven textiles belonging to communities such as the Bonda, Munda, Santal, Dharua and Kandha are also part of the display.

Gallery 3, Main Building

Hunting & Fishing Implements & Weapons of Offense and Defence

In this gallery, the skill at hunting is demonstrated along with the valour in defense of territory. Hunting and fishing implements, catapults, traps and snares are displayed alongside traditional weapons, bows, arrows, spears, axes, guns and swords. Apart from several intricate fishing traps designed to catch a variety of river fish, fishing spears, fish storage baskets and numerous fishing nets can be seen. Nets for trapping wild game as well as snares for rabbit, wild cock and other birds are also part of this display alongside traditional knives and axes that may be used for defence, clearing the forests and ceremonial sacrifices.

gallery 4

Gallery 4, Main Building

Household Objects and Agricultural Implements

Depicting the simple life of home and hearth, in this gallery one finds rudimentary tools for cultivation as well as an array of household utensils, knifes, containers and inventive utilities for sheltering from the rain, twisting rope and pressing oil. A variety of measuring containers as well as utensils made of dried gourd are also displayed along with digging sticks, straw collectors, levellers, ploughs, winnows and pestles. Allied household objects such as goat and cowbells, ropes, slings and carrying poles are also exhibited in this gallery.

gallery 3
gallery 4

Gallery 3, Main Building

Hunting & Fishing Implements & Weapons of Offense and Defence

In this gallery, the skill at hunting is demonstrated along with the valour in defense of territory. Hunting and fishing implements, catapults, traps and snares are displayed alongside traditional weapons, bows, arrows, spears, axes, guns and swords. Apart from several intricate fishing traps designed to catch a variety of river fish, fishing spears, fish storage baskets and numerous fishing nets can be seen. Nets for trapping wild game as well as snares for rabbit, wild cock and other birds are also part of this display alongside traditional knives and axes that may be used for defence, clearing the forests and ceremonial sacrifices.

Gallery 4, Main Building

Household Objects and Agricultural Implements

Depicting the simple life of home and hearth, in this gallery one finds rudimentary tools for cultivation as well as an array of household utensils, knifes, containers and inventive utilities for sheltering from the rain, twisting rope and pressing oil. A variety of measuring containers as well as utensils made of dried gourd are also displayed along with digging sticks, straw collectors, levellers, ploughs, winnows and pestles. Allied household objects such as goat and cowbells, ropes, slings and carrying poles are also exhibited in this gallery.

gallery 5

Gallery 5, Main Building

Dance, Musical Instruments and Dhokra Items

An ode to the joys of celebration, this gallery houses a collection of musical instruments; brass and horn trumpets, drums, cymbals, clappers and tambourines. Large drums made for dancing on festive occasions share space with special dancing costumes, string and percussion instruments, shakers, Jews harps and friction blocks. In addition, this gallery also houses an exquisite collection of Dhokra figurines. Made using the ancient process of lost wax casting, these figurines serve ritual as well as decorative purpose and depict humans, animals, birds and insects.

shrines

Courtyard, Main Building

Tribal Shrines

In the courtyard of the main museum building are 14 tribal shrines honouring spirits, gods and goddesses, viz.

 

1. Gudi: Shrine of village deity Bhima and Bhimsen of Bhottada community who are worshipped for good harvest, freedom from disease and natural calamity.

 

2. Birkam Asan: Shrine of the village goddess, Birkam Devta of the Bhumia who is propitiated for the well being of villagers and cattle, bumper harvests and prevention of disease in the young.

 

3. Hundi: The Earth Goddess worshipped by the Bonda so that she may ensure protection against disease, epidemics and crop failure due to insect attack.

 

4. Ladridokri Deo: The village deity of Dharua tribe, is enshrined with Bhandaridokri Deo. Both deities are supposed to protect against natural calamities, cholera, death of animals and birds, illness and disease.

 

5. Gulisang: Within this sacred enclosure are located shrines of Birhu, the earth goddess and Hundi, the village deity of the Didayi. They are venerated for soil fertility, heath of children and cattle, plentiful harvest and wild game.

 

6. Koteasal: Shrine of Koteyuvalli Penu, the consort of the earth goddess Dharni Penu worshipped by the Dangria Kandha. The deity is considered as the village guardian who watches over and protects the village.

 

7. Gudighara: Shrine of the village deity, Dharni Devta of the Holva. Sacrifices are offered here during March-April to ensure good harvest and health of the villagers and cattle.

 

8. Gram Siri: The village deity of the Juang, is worshipped for the protection of the village from calamity and misfortune.

 

9. Jhanker: A decorated Meriah post or sacrificial pillar of the Kandha community. The pillar is installed close to the shrine of the earth goddess, Dharni Penu. Here, the community offer sacrificial buffaloes to the goddess during the Kedu festival.

 

10. Dulari Devi: The village deity of the Koya, is installed along with other ritual objects. She is worshipped to ensure bumper harvest, successful hunting expeditions and relief in case of natural calamities.

 

11. Jananglo Sum: The wind deity of the Lanjia Saora is believed to protect the shrine of their village deity Mandua Sum as well as the entire village from bad weather and storms. He is also worshipped to cure serious illnesses and during the first eating ceremonies for sweet potato and red gram.

 

12. Gudighara: Shrine of Duarmundi Thakurani, the village deity of the Paroja. She is worshipped to ensure a good harvest, protection against disease and natural calamities, improvement of livestock and development of brotherhood among the community.

 

13. Thakurani Gudi: Shrine for Bhim Thakurani, the village deity of the Pentia, the seven sisters and Maa Thakurani. Offerings are made to the deities so that they bless the village with good health and a bumper harvest.

 

14. Jaher Era: At the centre of this sacred grove, in a shed called Jaherthan, the Santal deities, Gosaen era, Jaher era, Monrenko, Turuiko and Pargana Bonga are worshipped so that the village may have a good harvest and be safeguarded against disease and natural calamities.

gallery 5
shrines

Gallery 5, Main Building

Dance, Musical Instruments and Dhokra Items

An ode to the joys of celebration, this gallery houses a collection of musical instruments; brass and horn trumpets, drums, cymbals, clappers and tambourines. Large drums made for dancing on festive occasions share space with special dancing costumes, string and percussion instruments, shakers, Jews harps and friction blocks. In addition, this gallery also houses an exquisite collection of Dhokra figurines. Made using the ancient process of lost wax casting, these figurines serve ritual as well as decorative purpose and depict humans, animals, birds and insects.

Courtyard, Main Building

Tribal Shrines

In the courtyard of the main museum building are 14 tribal shrines honouring spirits, gods and goddesses, viz.

 

1. Gudi: Shrine of village deity Bhima and Bhimsen of Bhottada community who are worshipped for good harvest, freedom from disease and natural calamity.

 

2. Birkam Asan: Shrine of the village goddess, Birkam Devta of the Bhumia who is propitiated for the well being of villagers and cattle, bumper harvests and prevention of disease in the young.

 

3. Hundi: The Earth Goddess worshipped by the Bonda so that she may ensure protection against disease, epidemics and crop failure due to insect attack.

 

4. Ladridokri Deo: The village deity of Dharua tribe, is enshrined with Bhandaridokri Deo. Both deities are supposed to protect against natural calamities, cholera, death of animals and birds, illness and disease.

 

5. Gulisang: Within this sacred enclosure are located shrines of Birhu, the earth goddess and Hundi, the village deity of the Didayi. They are venerated for soil fertility, heath of children and cattle, plentiful harvest and wild game.

 

6. Koteasal: Shrine of Koteyuvalli Penu, the consort of the earth goddess Dharni Penu worshipped by the Dangria Kandha. The deity is considered as the village guardian who watches over and protects the village.

 

7. Gudighara: Shrine of the village deity, Dharni Devta of the Holva. Sacrifices are offered here during March-April to ensure good harvest and health of the villagers and cattle.

 

8. Gram Siri: The village deity of the Juang, is worshipped for the protection of the village from calamity and misfortune.

 

9. Jhanker: A decorated Meriah post or sacrificial pillar of the Kandha community. The pillar is installed close to the shrine of the earth goddess, Dharni Penu. Here, the community offer sacrificial buffaloes to the goddess during the Kedu festival.

 

10. Dulari Devi: The village deity of the Koya, is installed along with other ritual objects. She is worshipped to ensure bumper harvest, successful hunting expeditions and relief in case of natural calamities.

 

11. Jananglo Sum: The wind deity of the Lanjia Saora is believed to protect the shrine of their village deity Mandua Sum as well as the entire village from bad weather and storms. He is also worshipped to cure serious illnesses and during the first eating ceremonies for sweet potato and red gram.

 

12. Gudighara: Shrine of Duarmundi Thakurani, the village deity of the Paroja. She is worshipped to ensure a good harvest, protection against disease and natural calamities, improvement of livestock and development of brotherhood among the community.

 

13. Thakurani Gudi: Shrine for Bhim Thakurani, the village deity of the Pentia, the seven sisters and Maa Thakurani. Offerings are made to the deities so that they bless the village with good health and a bumper harvest.

 

14. Jaher Era: At the centre of this sacred grove, in a shed called Jaherthan, the Santal deities, Gosaen era, Jaher era, Monrenko, Turuiko and Pargana Bonga are worshipped so that the village may have a good harvest and be safeguarded against disease and natural calamities.

gallery 4
gallery 5
shrines

Gallery 4, Main Building

Household Objects and Agricultural Implements

Depicting the simple life of home and hearth, in this gallery one finds rudimentary tools for cultivation as well as an array of household utensils, knifes, containers and inventive utilities for sheltering from the rain, twisting rope and pressing oil. A variety of measuring containers as well as utensils made of dried gourd are also displayed along with digging sticks, straw collectors, levellers, ploughs, winnows and pestles. Allied household objects such as goat and cowbells, ropes, slings and carrying poles are also exhibited in this gallery.

Gallery 5, Main Building

Dance, Musical Instruments and Dhokra Items

An ode to the joys of celebration, this gallery houses a collection of musical instruments; brass and horn trumpets, drums, cymbals, clappers and tambourines. Large drums made for dancing on festive occasions share space with special dancing costumes, string and percussion instruments, shakers, Jews harps and friction blocks. In addition, this gallery also houses an exquisite collection of Dhokra figurines. Made using the ancient process of lost wax casting, these figurines serve ritual as well as decorative purpose and depict humans, animals, birds and insects.

Courtyard, Main Building

Tribal Shrines

In the courtyard of the main museum building are 14 tribal shrines honouring spirits, gods and goddesses, viz.

 

1. Gudi: Shrine of village deity Bhima and Bhimsen of Bhottada community who are worshipped for good harvest, freedom from disease and natural calamity.

 

2. Birkam Asan: Shrine of the village goddess, Birkam Devta of the Bhumia who is propitiated for the well being of villagers and cattle, bumper harvests and prevention of disease in the young.

 

3. Hundi: The Earth Goddess worshipped by the Bonda so that she may ensure protection against disease, epidemics and crop failure due to insect attack.

 

4. Ladridokri Deo: The village deity of Dharua tribe, is enshrined with Bhandaridokri Deo. Both deities are supposed to protect against natural calamities, cholera, death of animals and birds, illness and disease.

 

5. Gulisang: Within this sacred enclosure are located shrines of Birhu, the earth goddess and Hundi, the village deity of the Didayi. They are venerated for soil fertility, heath of children and cattle, plentiful harvest and wild game.

 

6. Koteasal: Shrine of Koteyuvalli Penu, the consort of the earth goddess Dharni Penu worshipped by the Dangria Kandha. The deity is considered as the village guardian who watches over and protects the village.

 

7. Gudighara: Shrine of the village deity, Dharni Devta of the Holva. Sacrifices are offered here during March-April to ensure good harvest and health of the villagers and cattle.

 

8. Gram Siri: The village deity of the Juang, is worshipped for the protection of the village from calamity and misfortune.

 

9. Jhanker: A decorated Meriah post or sacrificial pillar of the Kandha community. The pillar is installed close to the shrine of the earth goddess, Dharni Penu. Here, the community offer sacrificial buffaloes to the goddess during the Kedu festival.

 

10. Dulari Devi: The village deity of the Koya, is installed along with other ritual objects. She is worshipped to ensure bumper harvest, successful hunting expeditions and relief in case of natural calamities.

 

11. Jananglo Sum: The wind deity of the Lanjia Saora is believed to protect the shrine of their village deity Mandua Sum as well as the entire village from bad weather and storms. He is also worshipped to cure serious illnesses and during the first eating ceremonies for sweet potato and red gram.

 

12. Gudighara: Shrine of Duarmundi Thakurani, the village deity of the Paroja. She is worshipped to ensure a good harvest, protection against disease and natural calamities, improvement of livestock and development of brotherhood among the community.

 

13. Thakurani Gudi: Shrine for Bhim Thakurani, the village deity of the Pentia, the seven sisters and Maa Thakurani. Offerings are made to the deities so that they bless the village with good health and a bumper harvest.

 

14. Jaher Era: At the centre of this sacred grove, in a shed called Jaherthan, the Santal deities, Gosaen era, Jaher era, Monrenko, Turuiko and Pargana Bonga are worshipped so that the village may have a good harvest and be safeguarded against disease and natural calamities.

gallery 4
gallery 5
shrines

Gallery 4, Main Building

Household Objects and Agricultural Implements

Depicting the simple life of home and hearth, in this gallery one finds rudimentary tools for cultivation as well as an array of household utensils, knifes, containers and inventive utilities for sheltering from the rain, twisting rope and pressing oil. A variety of measuring containers as well as utensils made of dried gourd are also displayed along with digging sticks, straw collectors, levellers, ploughs, winnows and pestles. Allied household objects such as goat and cowbells, ropes, slings and carrying poles are also exhibited in this gallery.

Gallery 5, Main Building

Dance, Musical Instruments and Dhokra Items

An ode to the joys of celebration, this gallery houses a collection of musical instruments; brass and horn trumpets, drums, cymbals, clappers and tambourines. Large drums made for dancing on festive occasions share space with special dancing costumes, string and percussion instruments, shakers, Jews harps and friction blocks. In addition, this gallery also houses an exquisite collection of Dhokra figurines. Made using the ancient process of lost wax casting, these figurines serve ritual as well as decorative purpose and depict humans, animals, birds and insects.

Courtyard, Main Building

Tribal Shrines

In the courtyard of the main museum building are 14 tribal shrines honouring spirits, gods and goddesses, viz.

 

1. Gudi: Shrine of village deity Bhima and Bhimsen of Bhottada community who are worshipped for good harvest, freedom from disease and natural calamity.

 

2. Birkam Asan: Shrine of the village goddess, Birkam Devta of the Bhumia who is propitiated for the well being of villagers and cattle, bumper harvests and prevention of disease in the young.

 

3. Hundi: The Earth Goddess worshipped by the Bonda so that she may ensure protection against disease, epidemics and crop failure due to insect attack.

 

4. Ladridokri Deo: The village deity of Dharua tribe, is enshrined with Bhandaridokri Deo. Both deities are supposed to protect against natural calamities, cholera, death of animals and birds, illness and disease.

 

5. Gulisang: Within this sacred enclosure are located shrines of Birhu, the earth goddess and Hundi, the village deity of the Didayi. They are venerated for soil fertility, heath of children and cattle, plentiful harvest and wild game.

 

6. Koteasal: Shrine of Koteyuvalli Penu, the consort of the earth goddess Dharni Penu worshipped by the Dangria Kandha. The deity is considered as the village guardian who watches over and protects the village.

 

7. Gudighara: Shrine of the village deity, Dharni Devta of the Holva. Sacrifices are offered here during March-April to ensure good harvest and health of the villagers and cattle.

 

8. Gram Siri: The village deity of the Juang, is worshipped for the protection of the village from calamity and misfortune.

 

9. Jhanker: A decorated Meriah post or sacrificial pillar of the Kandha community. The pillar is installed close to the shrine of the earth goddess, Dharni Penu. Here, the community offer sacrificial buffaloes to the goddess during the Kedu festival.

 

10. Dulari Devi: The village deity of the Koya, is installed along with other ritual objects. She is worshipped to ensure bumper harvest, successful hunting expeditions and relief in case of natural calamities.

 

11. Jananglo Sum: The wind deity of the Lanjia Saora is believed to protect the shrine of their village deity Mandua Sum as well as the entire village from bad weather and storms. He is also worshipped to cure serious illnesses and during the first eating ceremonies for sweet potato and red gram.

 

12. Gudighara: Shrine of Duarmundi Thakurani, the village deity of the Paroja. She is worshipped to ensure a good harvest, protection against disease and natural calamities, improvement of livestock and development of brotherhood among the community.

 

13. Thakurani Gudi: Shrine for Bhim Thakurani, the village deity of the Pentia, the seven sisters and Maa Thakurani. Offerings are made to the deities so that they bless the village with good health and a bumper harvest.

 

14. Jaher Era: At the centre of this sacred grove, in a shed called Jaherthan, the Santal deities, Gosaen era, Jaher era, Monrenko, Turuiko and Pargana Bonga are worshipped so that the village may have a good harvest and be safeguarded against disease and natural calamities.

Special Gallery

PVTG World

Through a colourful combination of diorama and interactive kiosk, this gallery serves as an introduction to the life and culture of the 13 Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Communities that live in Odisha, namely Bonda, Chukutia Bhunjia, Didayi, Dangria Kandha, Hill Kharia, Juang, Kutia Kandha, Lodha, Lanjia Saora , Mankirdia / Birhor, Paudi Bhuinya and Saora.

outdoor-exhibition

Outdoor Exhibition

Tribal Huts

Recreations of traditional tribal dwellings, with their traditional demarcations of living, dining, cooking and praying areas; with separate cow shed and pig sty, these tribal huts contain a collection of household, agricultural and hunting implements. The 7 recreated dwellings belong to the Santal, Juang, Gadaba, Saora, Kandha, Gond and Chuktiya Bhunjia communities.

 

Kandha House: The Kandha house is rectangular with no windows and a wide verandah. The main living space has a wooden platform for storage of grain and household articles. The hearth and worship space are located within the kitchen. A separate shed is made for livestock at the back of the house.

 

Juang House and Dormitory: The Juang House has a single door, and no windows. This one room dwelling has a wooden platform on which grain is stored, and a hearth in addition to a mortar at the doorway. Also called Mandaghar, the Juang bachelors’ dormitory is where all unmarried boys of the village sleep at night. During the day it is used for village meetings and a fire is kept burning here year around.

 

Santal House: The Santal house is L-shaped with mud walls. The roof is supported on wooden pillars covered with straw or tiles. The house includes a main living space, hearth, store, verandah and a cattle shed.

 

Gond House: A single room dwelling, the Gond house has a covered verandah on three sides. The walls of the house are brightly painted with traditional Gond art. One part of the covered verandah is the family hearth while the other is used to store fishing implements.

 

Lanjia Saora House: The Lanjia Saora house is a single room dwelling. At one end a high wooden platform is used to store gain. Below it is the hearth and a small shrine. On the opposite end is the idital, a ritual painting made to appease various spirits. The pigsty and fowl pen are located under the verandah.

 

Chuktia Bhunjia House: The house is made of wooden posts plastered with mud. The main living space is sufficient to accommodate a married couple and their children. A verandah runs the length of the house and is used to entertain guests. The kitchen is a scared space and is built separate from the main house. Only family members are allowed to enter this space.

 

Gadaba House: The traditional Gadaba house is circular in construction. The roof is supported by a central wooden pole, within which the house deity is said to reside. Internally the house is divided into a main living space, a kitchen with a hearth and an inner room. This inner room is reserved for the family deities, and has its own hearth.

herbal garden

Outdoor Exhibition

Herbal Garden

As an introduction to the biodiversity of Odisha, an herbal garden of over 300 medicinal plants has been created in the premises of the museum. This garden helps orient a growing number of tourists to the eco-friendly practices and indigenous knowledge of herbal remedies of Odisha’s tribal communities.

Shop

Souvenir Shop

In an effort to conserve and promote the traditional art forms of tribal communities, the Museum organizes bi-monthly Live Demonstration programs. The works produced during these demonstration programs are available for sale at the museum. In addition, the Souvenir Shop at the Museum also sells a range of tribal handicrafts, textiles and organic produce.

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