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TRIBES OF ODISHA

TRIBES OF ODISHA

TRIBES OF ODISHA

Birhor

Mankidi, Mankirdia

Region: Sambalpur and Sundergarh

Population*: 203

Language: Birhor

Origin: The term Birhor literally means forest people. Believed to be an offshoot of the Kol, they share a common descent with tribes such as the Munda, Santal, Ho and Bhuiyans. Known also as the Mankidi and Mankirdia, the Birhor are a small community that live in scattered, shifting hamlets.

Settlement: Fond of music and dance, the Birhor play a variety of musical instruments like the madal, tomka, nagra and tirio or bamboo flute. Each dance, be it the Dong, Lagre or Karam is associated with a particular event and accompanying song.

Culture and Crafts: The temporary settlement of the Birhor is called a Tanda, and consists of 10 to 15 huts or kumbha made of sal leaves. The leaf dormitories are known as Dhugaa for the bachelors and Kudi Ada for the spinsters. Usually the Birhor settle in a given region for the entire rainy season but shift camp often in the winter and summer in search of siali and sal. In recent years, the Birhor have begun to construct rectangular houses of a permanent nature, with mud walls and thatched roofs and have been seen taking up agricultural activities.

Occupation: Leading a semi-nomadic lifestyle, the Birhor depend largely on the Similipal hill ranges for their livelihood. Siali bark is collected from the forest to make ropes and oil pressing baskets called topa which are then sold at local markets. Jute may also be used as a raw material, and date palm mats are also prepared by older women of the community. The community is famed for its skill in catching monkeys and trapping of small birds and animals which they sell locally for cash.

Video:

*Scheduled Tribes Population as per Census 2011 data.
 PVTGs Population as per Micro Project Survey Data, 2010

Birhor

Mankidi, Mankirdia

Region: Sambalpur and Sundergarh

Population*: 203

Language: Birhor

Origin: The term Birhor literally means forest people. Believed to be an offshoot of the Kol, they share a common descent with tribes such as the Munda, Santal, Ho and Bhuiyans. Known also as the Mankidi and Mankirdia, the Birhor are a small community that live in scattered, shifting hamlets.

Settlement: Fond of music and dance, the Birhor play a variety of musical instruments like the madal, tomka, nagra and tirio or bamboo flute. Each dance, be it the Dong, Lagre or Karam is associated with a particular event and accompanying song.

Culture and Crafts: The temporary settlement of the Birhor is called a Tanda, and consists of 10 to 15 huts or kumbha made of sal leaves. The leaf dormitories are known as Dhugaa for the bachelors and Kudi Ada for the spinsters. Usually the Birhor settle in a given region for the entire rainy season but shift camp often in the winter and summer in search of siali and sal. In recent years, the Birhor have begun to construct rectangular houses of a permanent nature, with mud walls and thatched roofs and have been seen taking up agricultural activities.

Occupation: Leading a semi-nomadic lifestyle, the Birhor depend largely on the Similipal hill ranges for their livelihood. Siali bark is collected from the forest to make ropes and oil pressing baskets called topa which are then sold at local markets. Jute may also be used as a raw material, and date palm mats are also prepared by older women of the community. The community is famed for its skill in catching monkeys and trapping of small birds and animals which they sell locally for cash.

Video:

*Scheduled Tribes Population as per Census 2011 data.
 PVTGs Population as per Micro Project Survey Data, 2010

Birhor

Mankidi, Mankirdia

Region: Sambalpur and Sundergarh

Population*: 203

Language: Birhor

Origin: The term Birhor literally means forest people. Believed to be an offshoot of the Kol, they share a common descent with tribes such as the Munda, Santal, Ho and Bhuiyans. Known also as the Mankidi and Mankirdia, the Birhor are a small community that live in scattered, shifting hamlets.

Settlement: Fond of music and dance, the Birhor play a variety of musical instruments like the madal, tomka, nagra and tirio or bamboo flute. Each dance, be it the Dong, Lagre or Karam is associated with a particular event and accompanying song.

Culture and Crafts: The temporary settlement of the Birhor is called a Tanda, and consists of 10 to 15 huts or kumbha made of sal leaves. The leaf dormitories are known as Dhugaa for the bachelors and Kudi Ada for the spinsters. Usually the Birhor settle in a given region for the entire rainy season but shift camp often in the winter and summer in search of siali and sal. In recent years, the Birhor have begun to construct rectangular houses of a permanent nature, with mud walls and thatched roofs and have been seen taking up agricultural activities.

Occupation: Leading a semi-nomadic lifestyle, the Birhor depend largely on the Similipal hill ranges for their livelihood. Siali bark is collected from the forest to make ropes and oil pressing baskets called topa which are then sold at local markets. Jute may also be used as a raw material, and date palm mats are also prepared by older women of the community. The community is famed for its skill in catching monkeys and trapping of small birds and animals which they sell locally for cash.

Video:

*Scheduled Tribes Population as per Census 2011 data.
 PVTGs Population as per Micro Project Survey Data, 2010

Birhor

Mankidi, Mankirdia

Region: Sambalpur and Sundergarh

Population*: 203

Language: Birhor

Origin: The term Birhor literally means forest people. Believed to be an offshoot of the Kol, they share a common descent with tribes such as the Munda, Santal, Ho and Bhuiyans. Known also as the Mankidi and Mankirdia, the Birhor are a small community that live in scattered, shifting hamlets.

Settlement: Fond of music and dance, the Birhor play a variety of musical instruments like the madal, tomka, nagra and tirio or bamboo flute. Each dance, be it the Dong, Lagre or Karam is associated with a particular event and accompanying song.

Culture and Crafts: The temporary settlement of the Birhor is called a Tanda, and consists of 10 to 15 huts or kumbha made of sal leaves. The leaf dormitories are known as Dhugaa for the bachelors and Kudi Ada for the spinsters. Usually the Birhor settle in a given region for the entire rainy season but shift camp often in the winter and summer in search of siali and sal. In recent years, the Birhor have begun to construct rectangular houses of a permanent nature, with mud walls and thatched roofs and have been seen taking up agricultural activities.

Occupation: Leading a semi-nomadic lifestyle, the Birhor depend largely on the Similipal hill ranges for their livelihood. Siali bark is collected from the forest to make ropes and oil pressing baskets called topa which are then sold at local markets. Jute may also be used as a raw material, and date palm mats are also prepared by older women of the community. The community is famed for its skill in catching monkeys and trapping of small birds and animals which they sell locally for cash.

Video:

*Scheduled Tribes Population as per Census 2011 data.
 PVTGs Population as per Micro Project Survey Data, 2010